Archive for the ‘MIT License’ Category

While developers may love diving under the hood, those are usually marketing people who end up using content management systems and paying money for web design agencies. And so great content management systems must be built with the actual content managers in mind first. One of such systems is ImpressPages.

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When it comes to drag ‘n’ drop and reordering elements with JavaScript, jQuery UI’s sortable widget is by far the most popular.

There is also a tutorial at WRD for using it with server-side scripting.

Sortable is a JavaScript library that performs the same task without any JavaScript framework.

Sortable

It uses the native HTML5 drag and drop API, has a small footprint (<2kb gzipped) and works on touch devices too.

Also, besides single lists, items can be moved between multiple lists too.

For responsive layouts, we may want to trigger different JavaScript codes depending on the screen size, platform or browser.

Simple State Manager is a lightweight and easy-to-use JavaScript State Manager for responsive websites.

It doesn’t require any JavaScript frameworks and a perfect companion for handling layout-specific code in a clean way.

Simple State Manager

You can define the breakpoints and pack all the JavaScript to be executed on that breakpoint. Once another breakpoint is reached, SSM disables all the previous custom code and triggers new ones (so you don’t have to).

The manager comes with a complete API, a debugger and plugin support for extending further.

Sometimes, using breakpoints in @mediaqueries are not enough and we also declare them (for further customizations) in JavaScript as well.

Unison.js is a tiny script (<1kb minified, gzipped) that enables us to declare breakpoints only once and use them both in JavaScript and markup.

Unison.js

It requires a preprocessor like SASS, LESS or Stylus to function. And, behind the scenes, it uses the font-family property on the page’s head and title tags to store information.

There is also a debug feature which prints the breakpoints to see them easier.

There are great and popular CSS preprocessors like SASS and LESS.

Myth is an other one which allows us to write pure CSS without having to worry about browser support, or even slow spec approval.

Myth CSS

It simply functions like a CSS polyfill but we can still use variables and math functions.

The tool auto-adds browser-prefixes, runs on Nodejs and has a nice JavaScript API.