Posts Tagged ‘Python’

QR Codes, a tracking code technology which was created in 1994 by Denso<Toyota to keep track of vehicles, is now a standard being used everywhere from websites to magazines, apps or stores.

In the web, considering the mobile devices are used as the barcode reader, QR Codes are usually used as an alternative way to show app download/purchase links, wi-fi passes, mobile version URLs of websites, etc.

I needed to create few of them in the past, used online QR Code generators and I was done in a few minutes.

Recently, a project required hundreds of them being generated automatically and I have played with many different JavaScript + server-side solutions. I have faced solutions that are -sometimes- not working correctly, not supporting too short or long texts or they were not simple enough. Here is the list of solid and good-quality QR Code generation resources that all work very straightforward:

P.S. I ended up using a JavaScript library which is so easy to implement, flexible in all levels, and, I knew that it would always be used by a modern browser. You can choose the solution that  fits the best to your case from the list below.

Online QR Code Generators



QRhacker is a beautifully implemented online QR code generator with many options for creating the QR code we want.

It allows many different input types (text, URL, phone number, VCard and Wi-Fi access) and offers customizations like the roundness of the blocks, their foreground/background colors, using images for them and more. Also, the code can be painted pixel-by-pixel.

Once the QR code is created, it can be downloaded either as an image or PDF.



QR codes have a built-in error-correction mechanism and codes that are slightly morphed can still be recognized correctly.

Unitag makes use of this and allows users to transform QR codes by curving the blocks, adding extra shaped and more.

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strftime, the popular function for formatting date-time (with PHP, Ruby, Python and C) has many parameters which are usually hard to remember.

There are several web-based references that ease the usage of strftime by enabling us to view the details of each parameter and test them instantly. Here they are: simply lists the parameters for dates + times separately with an explanation to each and allows us to view the output of any custom format.

The website displays all the parameters where each of them can be clicked to create the custom function.

P.S. It would be much better to see the result of the function instantly (feature request).

For a Good Strftime

For a Good Strftime

Besides presenting the parameters, there are presets for for the widely-used formats.

Also, there is a drag 'n' drop custom format builder.

Other References

WebPutty is an application that enables us to write CSS code with an online, feature-rich, syntax-highlighted editor and see the changes in real-time with a side-by-side preview panel.

The CSS file is hosted by the service so that any changes made are instantly reflected to the live website. And, you can host any number of CSS files under a single account.


It also supports SCSS and Compass which is great for anyone willing to make use of advanced styling features.

WebPutty was a free hosted service and it is now open sourced so that anyone can create their own instances and edit/manage CSS files of multiple projects from a single location.

AMPPS is a software for quickly installing Apache, MySQL, PHP, Perl and Python and creating a web server environment.

What differentiates it from other similar solutions is the built-in Softaculous package which makes 1 click installations of popular web apps possible.


There is a huge list of installable apps (250+) including WordPress, Joomla, Magento, phpBB and much more.

Using the AMPPS panel, the server resources can be configured and all the installations can be managed.

It has versions for Windows + Mac OS X and also installs phpMyAdmin + SQLite manager for controlling databases.

Kivy is an open source library for creating applications that work in multiple platforms using the same source code.

The library focuses on innovative user interfaces, like multi-touch apps, and can natively use most inputs protocols + devices like WM_Touch, WM_Pen, Mac OS X Trackpad and Magic Mouse, Mtdev, Linux Kernel HID, TUIO. There is also a multi-touch mouse simulator included.


It is built with Cython (C extensions for Python) and, in order to create apps, Python knowledge is required.

The platforms currently supported are Linux, Windows, Mac OS X and Android.

Kivy has functions to handle animation, caching, gestures, drawing and much more. There are also many built-in user interface elements like button, camera, grid, slider or tree view.